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I'd heard that "Japan" came from Chinese Jin-Pen-Kuo meaning (I think) "men
of the sunrise".
----- Original Message -----
From: "H. S. Teoh" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, November 04, 2001 9:36 PM
Subject: Re: places


> On Sun, Nov 04, 2001 at 01:16:03PM -0800, Frank George Valoczy wrote:
> [snip]
> > > I hear you, Nicole.  :-)  I've wondered where "Allemand" and "Germany"
> > > come from--historical reasons, perhaps?  (Does the latter name come
from
> > > the Romans?  I'm trying to remember my Tacitus...)  After all, Koreans
> > > call the place "Hangeuk," but that's because "Korea" comes from the
Koryo
> > > dynasty from a while back.  And where does "Japan" come from for
> > > Nihon/Nippon?
> >
> > Maybe from Chinese?
> [snip]
>
> *nods* Mandarin "jy4 pen3" (ok, I've NO idea what's the correct
> orthographic representation of the first syllable). In my L1, Hokkien,
> it's "ji3 pun4"; in Malay/Indonesian, it's "Jepun".
>
> It *could* be possible that it comes from the Chinese characters used to
> write "Nippon", which then got propagated to surrounding languages like
> Malay, but that's just my guess.
>
>
> T
>
> --
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