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Christophe Grandsire scripsit:

> Well, that's strange. We've had quite a few different assistants during my
> years of learning English, besides French teachers who were often considered
> completely bilingual. I remember four assistants especially, two from the
> United States, one from Britain and the other from Ireland. Well, one thing is
> sure, they *all* used [D] in "clothes", without exception (that was a very
> often used word, since I was often nearly the only one around who could master
> [T] and [D], and it was often used as example.

Hmm, I suspect this is "I am teaching furriners so I will pronounce it
the way I think it's supposed to be pronounced (viz. as spelled) and
not the way I normally say it or anyone else does" syndrome.

But I suspect the hypercorrect pron. is spreading among the rising
generation.

--
John Cowan <[log in to unmask]>     http://www.reutershealth.com
I amar prestar aen, han mathon ne nen,    http://www.ccil.org/~cowan
han mathon ne chae, a han noston ne 'wilith.  --Galadriel, _LOTR:FOTR_