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Ray wrote:

>David Peterson wrote:
>[snip]
>>This one /j\/ isn't a voiced, palatal stop, but a voiced, palatal fricative.
>
>Yep, [j\] is the voiced equivalent of German ich-laut.  IME the Spanish /j/
>is often pronounced this way, at least by Spanish speakers from Spain (I
>don't know about Latin American varieties).  I'd be suprised if any
>language had /j\/ and /j/ as separate phonemes.

If I understand this correctly (I'm just not a SAMPA kinda guy) (try
as I will, I have a mental block on learning some of these symbols)
(would this be the looped z (Kirshenbaum [C<vcd.>])?), then I think
Shanghainese qualifies. (The minimal pairs I'm thinking of at the
moment aren't the best examples, so I'll bring some in tomorrow.) And
if *that* assumption is true, then Géarthnuns qualifies (ditto on the
pairs). And if the z with a dot over it (or z with some other
diacritic) in Polish is this sound, then perhaps there are pairs in
Polish, too? Jan, any light to shed?

Kou