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From: "Nik Taylor" <[log in to unmask]>

> Peter Clark wrote:
> > For instance, which has a
> > higher degree of probability: k > x or x > k?
>
> Stops are more likely to become fricatives than the other way around,
> especially in environments such as intervocalic or syllable-finally
> (incidentally, early Uatakassi had syllable-final stops -> fricatives;
> while Ch˙ju, a descendant I'm currently working on, had IV non-geminate
> stop -> fricatives)

I know of one case of x > k -- Chinese loanwords into Japanese. Example:
Mandarin /han/ [xan] "Chinese", Japanese /kan/ (but Korean /han/). In a
conlang, Greek /x/ corresponds with Linkua (Troll) /k/, which is made up of
100% loanwords.

~Danny~