Print

Print


Hi,

I'm a biological researcher and I work on an insect species that lives in
underwater clay and shale deposits in many locations in the United States.
I have a request for any freshwater divers on the list who may be able to
help me.

These insects are larvae of Chironomid midges and look like red worms
about 1 inch long. They live in burrows in clay or shale with closely
approximated openings, and are often present in huge numbers (over 10,000
per square yard). Some pictures and a more detailed description of the
burrows can be seen here:

http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/conn.river/axarus.html

What I would like is to obtain specimens of these things from as wide an
area as possible. They have been reported from Leavenworth County State
Lake in Kansas, Lake Texoma in Texas/Oklahoma, the Chesapeake Bay Basin
(probably the Potomac River or the Delaware). If anyone knows of
populations of these things that they could collect for me please contact
me. There is a special chemical solution that larvae will need to be
preserved in so if you know of a population that you can dive for me I
will send you some of that beforehand. I am willing to pay for your time
and of course your assistance will be acknowledged in any publications.

Thanks very much for any assistance list members can provide.

Sean

Sean F. Werle <[log in to unmask]>
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Morrill Science Center, UMass, Amherst
Work: (413)-545-0524
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/conn.river