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>>Ancient Chinese (or whatever you call the old members of that
>>language family) had, IIRC, initial consonant alternation serving
>>several grammatical purposes. In particular, there was an *{s-}
>>prefix which was used to add a causative aspect to a verb. This
>>prefix was apparently lost later, but before that it produced
>>changes in the following consonant (devoicing: */sb/ -> /p/,
>>or metathesis: */st/ -> /ts/). This is all something I vaguelly
>>recall from an article I read once, but I think the basics are
>>right. In fact, I've been toying with the idea of a language
>>like that myself, where alternation plays a more important
>>role than affixation.


That's a really interesting Idea...I've barely though of that. I have
experiments where the first two letters change to mark verb, noun,
adjective, etc. But not quite in the same way, I don't beleive...
I'm going to play with that
-Aleks

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