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On Tue, 23 Jul 2002 17:00, Jeff Jones wrote:
> On Mon, 22 Jul 2002 21:30:35 +1200, Wesley Parish
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I'm having some trouble following this part. Perhaps some complete
> interlinears would help me?

Your wish is my command :)

|En   tref    ma   li'    ierrat   di       nan        a en           ierrat|
  I    went   to    the  hill     conj    sat-on     (pers.)  I     the hill.

|Aiator  a       li'     tua                      en  di           li'   tref
loves   (pers.) the midwife's daughter me   and so  she  went

ma u vaiti'anor u   fait un   en.|
to  a village     of  kin  of   mine.

|iam u te   li'    vaniro          ma  un en|
because  she  was looking  for   me

the particle cluster |iam| = for |u| = such |te| = that, meaning "because"

en = I, me; li' = the, he, she; ma = to, for - the use of |ma| as "for" is a
colloquialism of the young and is deprecated by the elders; u = a, of, from -
indicates that "x" is an indefinite quantity, or a part of a larger group,
when used as a prefix to a personal pronoun it indicates a certain
uncertainty on the part of the speaker; -f is the past tense suffix, -o is a
present tense suffix, though there are several - strictly speaking |vaniro|
should read |vanirif| but because of the speaker's state of mind - surprise
and shock - he puts it into the present tense for added value; di = and, but
(conjugation) only used with statives, largely because statives themselves
aren't agentive and don't cause per se results in their Objects/Patients :

nan a en ierrat = I sat on a hill; consequently the hill got up and left?
Bad breath?  I farted?  Mutual feelings of distaste at the other one?

When the stative refers to the emotions, it is viewing them from the
perspective of the person feeling them.  Li' anyerra-tarah = "The
coast-language" doesn't have a passive, and isn't interested in having one.

Lu syara a li' ankhayan po'i di lu li' ankha'i li' hara li' hanya u po'i! -
May the rite-singer bless you and may she sing your health and strength!

Wesley Parish

>
> Jeff J.
>
> > consequently, complex sentence structures can be broken down into two
> > forms:
> >
> >one where the consequence of the action is yet more action, in which case
> >there is a set of particles to carry over from SVO to SVO;
> >
> > the other where the action concludes in a placing or positioning of some
> > sort (emotions are considered stative), or a placing/positioning results
> > in an action, where a simple conjugation indicates that the topic of the
> > SVO and the VS are the same -
> >
> > |En tref ma li' ierrat di nan a en ierrat|
> >
> > = I went to the hill and on the hill I sat.
> >
> > |Aiator a li' tua en di li' tref ma u vaiti'anor u fait un en.|
> >
> > = The midwife's daughter loves me and so went to a village of my kin.
> > ( |u| and |un| are partitive prepositions/indefinite articles.)
> >
> >If one were to say "because she was looking for me" one would need to add
> >
> >|iam u te li' vaniro ma un en|, the particle cluster |iam| = for |u| =
> >| such te| = that, meaning "because".
> >|
> > |li' | is both "the" when it preposes a noun, and "he", and "she" on its
> >
> > own.
> >
> >Wesley Parish
> >--
> >Mau e ki, "He aha te mea nui?"
> >You ask, "What is the most important thing?"
> >Maku e ki, "He tangata, he tangata, he tangata."
> >I reply, "It is people, it is people, it is people."

--
Mau e ki, "He aha te mea nui?"
You ask, "What is the most important thing?"
Maku e ki, "He tangata, he tangata, he tangata."
I reply, "It is people, it is people, it is people."