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Bama!
One of my favorite songs is "Portmore". It's about a city in Ireland (I
think) being destroyed by the English, and also about English lumber
practices. I've been translating it into Tallefkeul, but I was interested
in seeing what other languages might do with it. Besides, we've lost our
glut of translation exercises (along with Aidan), and I thought I'd add
something.

So here it is:

Oh, bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree,
For it stood on your shore for many's the long day
Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.

Oh, bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand,
And the more I think on you, the more I think long.
If I had you now as I had once before,
All the lords of old England would not purchase Portmore.

All the birds in the forest, they bitterly weep,
Saying, "Where shall we slumber? Where shall we sleep?
For the oak and the ash, they are all cutting down,
And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground."

Oh, bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand,
And the more I think on you, the more I think long.
If I had you now as I had once before,
All the lords of old England would not purchase Portmore.


Laimes,
Wright.

____
"Through not observing the thoughts of another a man is seldom unhappy,
but he who does not observe the movements of his own mind must of
necessity be unhappy."
--Marcus Aurelius