Print

Print


        Discworld? Do you mean a giant disk in space in orbit around a star? I can't
comment on the climate until I have a clearer image of what it is. Right now,
I'm imagining a giant round disk, with one side perpetually facing the star,
the other perpetually facing away. Please correct me.

> Next - Gravity:
>
> Gravity is caused not by the disc, but by the Gravitational Centre of the
> Universe.  This decides what is up and what is down, and the Disc should
> orbit it .  The Sun is not held in place by gravity as much as the Disc's
> magnetic field.  In winter, the Sun's magnetic field grows stronger, and is
> pushed away...
        Uh...you said that you were using real-world physics? Unless there has been
some serious changes in the understanding of gravity in the last couple of
years, this is way off...
        Right now I am too confused to comment; if this were another universe, with
different physics rules, then sure, anything goes. But *here*,  any object
exerts a gravitational pull; it's simply that the pull is weak unless you
start dealing with massive objects. You would need one heck of a magnetic
field to keep a stupendously large ball of flaming hydrogen and helium in
place; I can't even begin to imagine the energy required to produce such a
magnetic field by artificial means.
        Or perhaps I am going about this the wrong way--is this your conculture's
view of the mechanics of the universe? In which case, you could ditch any
reference to gravity; a primitive knowledge of magents and some wild
hypothesi (pl. form?) as to the nature of attraction and repulsion ought to
be sufficient.
        Need more info...
        :Peter