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Thomas Wier wrote:
> > (French is also interesting in that
> > department, with lots and lots of places, even smaller ones, having
> > special names for the inhabitants; whence e.g. "salade niçoise" from
> > "Nice".)
>
>Yeah, Britain can be like that too, although the only ones that
>spring to mind ("Mancunian", "Liverpudlian", "Oxonian", etc.)
>are relatively famous or big.  America is relative deficient,
>besides the few oddities like "Michigander".  Although the modern
>inhabitants of Texas are called Texans, they were not always so:
>during the Republic, they were "Texians", and that is still the
>appropriate adjective for people living in Texas between 1817
>and 1845.

I seem to remember seeing the form "Texacans" somewhere. Has it be correct
usuage during some period or in some context, or is it merely a weirdity?

                                                    Andreas

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