Print

Print


Roberto Suarez Soto scripsit:

>         No, that's not correct. In spanish, indefinite article is
> "un/una" (for masc./fem., respectively). "uno" is only used as a
> pronoun, i.e.: "Uno menos para la cuenta atr=E1s" ("One less for the
> countdown"), "=BFTienes un perro? S=ED, tengo uno" ("Do you have a dog?
> Yes, I have one". I think that "un/una" and "uno/una" are used exactly
> like english "a" and "one".

Well, I invite you to examine and give your commentary on
http://www.unidadenladiversidad.com/opinion/opinion_ant/2000/abril_2000/Definiciones.htm
which purports to be an extract from the Dictionary of the Royal Academy
(21st edition) for "hombre":  it defines the following phrases:

# no ser uno hombre de pelea.  fr. fig. Carecer de ánimo, resolución y
# habilidad para empresas varoniles o negocios de importancia.
#
# no tener uno hombre.  fr. No tener protector o favorecedor.
#
# ser uno hombre al agua.  fr. fig. y fam. No dar esperanza de remedio en
# su salud o en su conducta.
#
# ser uno hombre muy llegado a las horas de comer.  fr. fam. Estar pronto
# a ejecutar las cosas que le son de utilidad.
#
# ser uno hombre para alguna cosa.  fr. Ser capaz de ejecutar lo que
# dice u ofrece.  Tener las cualidades y requisitos convenientes para el
# desempeño de lo que se trata.
#
# ser uno mucho hombre.  fr. Ser persona de gran talento e instrucción o
# de gran habilidad.
#
# ser uno muy hombre.  fr. Ser valiente y esforzado.
#
# ser uno otro hombre.  fr. fig. Haber cambiado mucho en sus cualidades,
# ya físicas, ya morales.
#
# ser uno poco hombre.  fr. Carecer de las cualidades necesarias para el
# desempeño de un oficio, cargo o comisión.  Ser cobarde.

but also, on the other hand,

# ser todo un hombre.  Tener destacadas cualidades varoniles, como el valor,
# la firmeza y la fuerza.

>         That phrase you got by googling would sound *way* weird to a
> spanish speaker, and surely you will be laughed at, naked, covered in
> tar and feathers, pursued out of town by wild dogs, and thrown to the
> river with a 500lb stone tied to your feet. Well, maybe not all this,
> but you wouldn't like it anyway :-)

A sad fate for all lexicographers!

--
You are a child of the universe no less         John Cowan
than the trees and all other acyclic            http://www.reutershealth.com
graphs; you have a right to be here.            http://www.ccil.org/~cowan
  --DeXiderata by Sean McGrath                  [log in to unmask]