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----- Original Message -----
From: "bnathyuw" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2002 3:18 PM
Subject: Re: Is there a conlang inspired in Old English?


> --- Lars Henrik Mathiesen <[log in to unmask]> wrote: >
> > Date:         Fri, 6 Sep 2002 09:52:38 +0100
> > > From: =?iso-8859-1?q?bnathyuw?=
> > <[log in to unmask]>
> > >
> > >  --- Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > >
> > > [Icelandic and English don't have front rounded
> > vowels.]
> > >
> > > as for english, true, except in dialects.
> > birmingham
> > > is [b8mIN@m] in birmingham, and scottish english
> > /u/
> > > often tends towards [y], ( eg [byk] for book )
> > > presumably in line with lowland scots |ui| ( buik
> > )
> >
> > SAMPA [8] is central rounded --- not front. And
> > besides, that's how
> > I've always thought the city's name was pronounced.
> > (Danish schools
> > aim for an RP-like accent when teaching English).
> >
> > What is it in real RP?
> >
>
> oops . . . clearly my sampa's already rusty.
>
> i would transcribe the usual vowel as /3/, but i could
> be being led astray be ipa. basically the long schwa
>
> the birmingham pronunciation _is_ stereotypically
> front rounded
>
> bn
>
> =====
> bnathyuw | landan | arR
> stamp the sunshine out | angelfish
> your tears came like anaesthesia | phèdre
>
>


And nasal...

/b2_nmIN@m/ as opposed to RP /b3:mINgh@m/