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Quoting Josh Brandt-Young <[log in to unmask]>:

> Ana vien,
>
> I discovered today, to my great joy, that the present tense of OE "cwethan"
> has in fact not died out entirely in modern English--it survives in
> "bequeath," which means that I can now achieve an entirely new level of
> unintelligibility by using "queath" and "quoth" in my daily conversation.
>
> The question, then: Someone *must* at some point have gone through and
> found
> OE equivalents to a bunch of modern English words--I've heard of Cleansed
> English, though I haven't been able to find out anything about it. Does
> anyone have any resources to this end or know where they can be found?

     Ah, Cleansed English. I'm the guilty party responsible for the name,
although the idea is by no means unique or original. You know, one would think
that such a project would be easier than creating an a priori language, but it's
not. First, there's the drudgery of making a list of sheep (good, hearty
Anglo-Saxon words, and some Norse words if they swear to behave) and goats
(French, Latin, and Greek villains that must needs be roast in the
netherdarkness). As you can see, it helps to develop a sense of humor. :)  Then
there's the problem of determining where to draw the line. Take "roast" for
instance. M-W gives the etymology as "Middle English rosten, from Old French
rostir, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German rOsten to roast." So it's
Germanic, but not Anglo-Saxon.  Then comes the really hard part: coining new
words and calques to replace the goats. I'm particularly fond of "girdring" for
"surround" but the process requires a great deal of thought and creativity.
    On my list of things to do is to write a program that will go through the
1913 Webster's Dictionary (freely available in electronic form) and scan the
etymologies, creating lists of words to keep and words to toss. Hopefully that
will take care of the first problem.
    To add to Philip's list, here are some other links that you may be
interested in:
    http://www.ibiblio.org/lineback/words/sax.htm - An incomplete listing of A-S
words that have survived into the present time. I'm not sure where this list
came from. The parent page seems to indicate that it came from Fowler's "King's
English" book, but Bartleby (http://www.bartleby.com/116/index.html) doesn't
seem to have any reference to such a list.
    http://www.mun.ca/Ansaxdat/vocab/wordlist.html - Modern English to Old
English dictionary.
    :Peter