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| -----Original Message-----
| From: Pablo David Flores
| Subject: Re: Definite/Indefinite Article Distinction
|
| Actually, "kore" functions like a noun, and "kono"
| as an adjective. It's the difference between "this"
| in "this tree" and in "this is a tree".

        Sorry, thanks!

| Also, aren't those called "deictics"?

        My linguistics professor used the term "dactyls" last week. He said
they are "pointing" words, sort of "verbal fingers" to indicate what you're
"verbally pointing to".

| Japanese has three levels of deixis (this/that/yonder)
| as you said, same as Spanish (este/ese/aquel), where
| English has two. A more complicated system, anybody? :)
| --Pablo Flores

        Hawaiian's is also threefold:
kia = this near me
kn = that near you
kl = that over there, away from us both

        I've also been told that the intermediate distance in Japanese
(sore, sono, soko, etc.) is sometimes used as "that near you".

______________________________________
Mike Karapcik   *       Tampa, FL
Network Analyst *       USF campus
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Research Center
ConlangCode: v1.1 CIT !h+ !u cG:M:R:S:G a+ y n30:3
B+++/R:Wic A+ E+ N1 Is/d K ia-:+ p-- s- m o P S----
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