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On Friday 17 January 2003 7:55 pm, Joe wrote:
> On Friday 17 January 2003 7:16 pm, Tim May wrote:
> > Joe writes:
> >  > On Friday 17 January 2003 6:59 pm, H. S. Teoh wrote:
> >  > > On Fri, Jan 17, 2003 at 01:13:51PM -0500, James Landau wrote:
> >  > > [snip]
> >  > >
> >  > > > > But if it's the same as in
> >  > > > >"saw", most people would consider that the same as the vowel of
> >  > > > > "hot". And then you've got even more trouble.
> >  > > >
> >  > > >  I interpret the "all" or "saw" vowel sound as meaning it has that
> >  > > > "w" glide at the end -- like the sound people make at something
> >  > > > disappointing. (Or, come to think of it, something really cute . .
> >  > > > .) Like the vowel sound in "port", just without an R after it.
> >  > > > "Hot", on the other hand, mind be interpreted as a pure /a/ . . .
> >  > >
> >  > > [snip]
> >  > >
> >  > > OK, I just *cannot* let that past me, no matter how hard I try :-)
> >  > > I grew up with, and am extremely calcified, with pronouncing "hot"
> >  > > as [hAt] instead of [hat] (probably a Britishism). Of course, this
> >  > > depends on which English idiolect you're talking about; but I
> >  > > believe /o/ as [a] is a purely American feature.
> >  > >
> >  > >
> >  > > T
> >  >
> >  > Well, the normal British expression is [hOt].  It is the same vowel as
> >  > in saw[sO:], just shorter.
> >
> > Well, _I_ say it's [hQt], and the OED agrees with me. :-P
>
> Well, I have problems with distinguishing [O] and [Q] when short.

On second thoughts, you're probably right...[hQt] sounds right.