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H. S. Teoh scripsit:

> The reason for all this complication is because you aren't supposed to
> call people by their names if they're in an older generation; you *have*
> to call them by the proper term. Quite often, the term itself becomes
> their "name" as far as you're concerned.

It's common (almost obligatory) for Jewish boys to be named, at least in
their Hebrew names, after their dead relatives, frequently their grandfathers
(my friend Joe Zitt is Yosef ben Hirsh ben Yosef ben Hirsh ben Yosef etc.
as far back as anyone can go).

There's a story about a couple that named their son Zalman, after his
great-grandfather Zeyde.  (Zeyde = "Grandfather".)

--
John Cowan  [log in to unmask]  www.reutershealth.com  www.ccil.org/~cowan
Consider the matter of Analytic Philosophy.  Dennett and Bennett are well-known.
Dennett rarely or never cites Bennett, so Bennett rarely or never cites Dennett.
There is also one Dummett.  By their works shall ye know them.  However, just as
no trinities have fourth persons (Zeppo Marx notwithstanding), Bummett is hardly
known by his works.  Indeed, Bummett does not exist.  It is part of the function
of this and other e-mail messages, therefore, to do what they can to create him.