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Micahel Beddow wrote:
>The use of clear will certainly stop relatively-positioned floated segs
>trying to occupy the same space, but James' problem actually arose because
>he wanted to use absolute positioning to constrain the marginal note always
>to align with its reference point in the body text (in other words to avoid
>the behaviour which "clear" plus relative positioning produces in problem
>cases).
<snip />
> That way the highest annotation element in the z-order overlays those lower
>down. Once again the layout has to be scripted, so that the assigned
>z-orderings can be tracked and manipulated to bring the item the user wants
>to view to the front of the stack (this is one of the ways "tabbed" displays
>are produced). But I'm not convinced it's worth the effort.


In the case of the print publication that I'm playing with (A volume of the
Records of Early English Drama project)all notes were printed in the left-hand
margin, with a glyph to indicate if they originally were in the right margin.
This is because they use the right margin for line numbers that I am not
duplicating.  However, more importantly, notes that are "too long to be printed in the
margin" are indicated with a symbol and printed in the endnotes.  So I think
the solution is to do the non-absolute positioning floating left and right
in the margin, if the note is under x characters, and if it is over, to place
it as an endnote with a symbol.  That is fairly straightforward in both xsl and
css and avoids the necessity for javascript, and works out as browser-compatible
with any browser with decent css support.  I realise I'm stepping down from
wanting absolute positioning...as long as the gloss isn't *too* far from its
source, then I think the lack of effort compensates for any inconvenience.

-James

--
Dr James Cummings, [log in to unmask], http://www.uea.ac.uk/~q503
Cursus Project, School of Music, University of East Anglia,
Norwich, Norfolk, NR4 7TJ, UK  Tel:(01603)593-595