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Christophe Grandsire scripsit:

> Actually, all the dictionaries I know list Latin verbs by the indicative
> present first person. They also add to it the indicative present second
> person, the infinitive, the indicative perfect first person and the supine

Anglophone dictionaries omit the second of these, which can (always?) be
deduced from the citation form and the infinitive.  My Latin textbook
listed the masc. fut. act. part. rather than the supine, different
merely in being -us rather than -um, but this was not true of my father's
Latin textbook.

Useful Latin verbs with principal parts (work best in the Church Latin
pronunciation):

        pigo, pigere, squili, gruntum
        flio, flire, itci, scratium

The meanings are omitted as obvious.

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