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Quoting Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]>:

> > 1) I eat food.
> > 2) I run.
> > 3) I fall.

[...]

> What would we call a language that marks "I" from (1) the same as "I" in
> (3), and "I" in (2) the same as "food" in (1)? Beyond weird, that is.

This would still be a split-S language.  Split-S languages are
defined, in contrast to fluid-S languages, by the fact that verbs
simply subcategorize for whether the single argument patterns as
the NP-1 of transitives or NP-2 of transitives.  It is also
characteristic of such languages that many verbs take the unexpected
marking, such as patientive for run or agentive for fall.

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Thomas Wier            "I find it useful to meet my subjects personally,
Dept. of Linguistics    because our secret police don't get it right
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