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--- Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Quoting Costentin Cornomorus
> <[log in to unmask]>:
>
> > --- Christophe Grandsire
> > <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > > >Meaning?
> > >
> > > "shift". It's a geometrical term only.
> >
> > I.e., what the word literally means:
> >
> > trans + ferre = bring across, or shift.
>
> Don't you have that usage in English?

Which? Translate = shift? Archaically, yes.
Personally, I would think of translate, in the
sense of shift, in a spiritual, philospohical or
otherworldly sense. And it would be a "fancy"
word at that, one suited to high prose or verse.

The usual sense of "translate" is to render forn
gibberish into sensible language, i.e. English.
;) "Shift" or "move" are the usual words for
altering the place of someone or something.

Padraic.


=====
Samlan, isa-susansilo-war-mercumo crastandus, en! mercumes-don-crâgamando, en!
mercumes-dom-resmanstaro haccruçen-fon-Mursilbâm!

And now, the corpse lies limp, lo! even the body of strength, lo! even the body
of Mursilbâm that slew the monster!
  [Erronian fragment]

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