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John Cowan wrote:>
> A flightless bird, _Casuarius casuarius_, indigenous to northern
> Australia and New Guinea, and first brought to Europe by the Dutch
> in 1597.  That particular bird was later given to Emperor Rudolf II.
> The English name is a respelling of the Malay _kesuari_.

Right.  I used to walk past a large house and grounds in Makassar where one
was kept as a "pet", wandering around at will.  A remarkably messy looking
beast, and I'm told they have rather nasty personalities....I'm sure Tristan
adopted the name for other reasons......

I've often suspected that the pine tree variety common in Florida
("Australian Pine"*) gets it Latin name _casuarina_ from the resemblance of
its long droopy needles to the bird's long droopy feathers.
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*Perhaps mostly in the Miami-Palm Beach area I think. An attractive and
graceful tree, can grow very tall-- but it's weak and prone to break or fall
over in hurricanes.  Also like many Aussie imports, it drinks heavily and
spreads easily, consequently is now considered a pest.
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>
> > Normally, I would say [Ej]. However, this is one of those diphthongs
that
> > strongly tend to differ regionally [E:, e, Aj, Oj, etc.]. I'm not sure
> > about the pronunciation in Zeeland.

The [Oj] is interesting-- that is?/used to be the sort-of upper-class East
Coast pronunciation of Standard [aj] (variously referred to as the Larchmont
Lockjaw or  Main Line Malocclusion).  I heard it from classmates at
hoity-toity boarding-school half a century ago (aargh).
>
> I definitely heard someone in the Netherlands point to a canal lock and
> say [sl2Hs], though I can't remember what part of the country I was in.
>
I think that's more likely "sluis"....?