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On Saturday, November 29, 2003, at 02:15  AM, Paul Bennett wrote:
> On Fri, 28 Nov 2003 15:07:40 -0800, Apollo Hogan
> <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>> For example, I have a book printed in 1944
>> (Jordan Jovkov's "Staroplaninski Legendi".)  In there, the yers are
>> silent
>> when word-final, as in Russian.  There is also still used two other
>> signs,
>> which I've forgotten the names of, so I'll draw little pictures:
>> ---
>> \ /
>> /|\   which is usually corresponds to  'yer' (but is used in 'ca'
>> [they]
>> are)
>> / | \
>> and
>>
>> |
>> -+-
>> |
>> |\   which usually corresponds to 'e'
>> | \
>> ---
>
> If I'm reading your diagrams correctly, that's "Big Yus" and "Yat",
> Unicode
> U+046A/046B Ѫ/ѫ and U+0462/0463 Ѣ/ѣ repectively.
> Paul

Big Yus has been used in the Cyrillic transliteration of Rokbeigalmki
to represent /V/, which was suggested because "Bulgarian used to".


-Stephen (Steg)
  "You will begin to touch heaven, Jonathan, in the moment
   that you touch perfect speed.  And that isn't flying a thousand
   miles an hour, or a million, or flying at the speed of light.
   Because any number is a limit, and perfection doesn't have
   limits.  Perfect speed, my son, is being there."
                     ~ _jonathan livingston seagull_ by richard bach