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Doktoro Esperanto estas la pseŭdonimo per kiu Ludoviko ZAMENHOF
publikigis sian Unuan Libron.
Amike,
Jacques
*

On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 22:57:57 -0300, Daniel Castro Landeira
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>   Some days ago I saw for the first time in my life a street with the
>name "Esperanto". It was in the city of Córdoba (second largest in
>Argentina). I didn't know it existed; I saw the street sign through the
>bus window, totally by chance.
>
>   How this street got its present name, I don't know. (Of course,
>Argentine politicians are corrupt, so if you bribe half of the
>members, plus one, of the municipal council of any city you can get the
>name of one of its streets changed to "Esperanto". Unfortunately, this
>procedure is beyond the financial possibilities of local Esperanto
>leagues).
>
>   Also, I don't know if there are more Esperanto streets in other
>Argentine cities. (Certainly not in Buenos Aires or its suburbs). But
>then I came to think: Isn't an Esperanto street a strange thing?
>
>   Let's see: usually names of streets are given to honor prominent
>people; in Buenos Aires we have streets with the name of Copernicus,
>Newton, Linnaeus, Pasteur, Einstein, Edison, etc. So we would, at last,
>expect a "Zamenhof" street. An "Esperanto" street seems as strange as a
>street called "Heliocentric System", "Law of Universal Gravitation",
>"Botanical Classification", "Anti-rabic Vaccine", "Theory of Relativity"
>or "Incandescent Lamp".
>
>   However, the reason for Esperanto streets throughout the world is
>clear: the majority of people usually doesn't care about the origins of
>street names; if they see a "L. L. Zamenhof" street, they probably won't
>ask themselves "Who was this guy?" and won't go to an encyclopedic
>dictionary to learn he was the creator of the international language
>Esperanto. If they see, instead, an "Esperanto" street, probably they
>will think "Ah, Esperanto. Wasn't it the name of an international
>language created long ago? But hadn't this project failed? Probably, if
>someone got the name of this street changed to Esperanto, this means
>it's still alive." And the advertising purpose is fulfilled.
>
>Daniel
>
>P.S.: Of course, one could argue that an "Esperanto" street isn't much
>different from an "Einstein", etc., street, as Esperanto wasn't
>originally the name of a language but the name (or pseudonym) of a
>person. But if you ask a large number of educated people which is the
>meaning of the word "Esperanto", 99.9% will answer "It's the name of an
>international language" and only .1% will say "It's the pseudonym of the
>creator of an international language".