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On Thu, 5 Feb 2004, Ray Brown wrote:

> On Wednesday, February 4, 2004, at 12:00 PM, Tristan McLeay wrote:
>
> > On Wed, 4 Feb 2004, Andreas Johansson wrote:
> [snip]
>
> >> Your adpositions should be impositions (ie, go in the middle of the word)
> >> .
> >
> > Doesn't that make them infixes? Or I guess not, while 'in a dog' could be
> > 'doing',
>
> Wacky.
>
> > 'in a big dog' could be 'big in dog', couldn't it?
>
> Er, sort of like Latin 'magno in cane'? I would think something sanctioned
> by
> Classical Latin is automatically disqualified from wackiness.

No-no, I mean both at the same time. So when you have an odd number of
words in a imposition-modified clause(?), you put the imposition in the
middle of the middle word, but when you have an even number of words, it
goes between the two middlest ones.

--
Tristan