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I've tried to reformulate the rules for gerunds and infinitives because
some phrasal verbs can be
followed by "to" and the infinitive".
I'd like some feedback, because I'm not sure I've got it right

DEFINITIONS
For the purposes of this discussion,
A phrasal verb means a verb followed by a preposition and or an adverb.
An adverb does not include the question words: who, what, where, when, how,
etc.

VERBS FOLLOWED BY GERUNDS
1.A two word phrasal verb can always be followed by a gerund if,
a) It is logically capable of doing it's action to another verb.
b) It has no substantive object (the verb that follows it can have a
substantive object.)
c) It does not begin with "would"
d) It does not end in "to"

Unless,
i)  It is logically capable of doing it's action to a stative verb.
ii) It's meaning implies a single-minded purpose.

(Some two part phrasal verbs can also be followed by the infinitive and "to"
this significantly changes the meaning in the case of "go on")

2. Three part phrasal verbs that fulfill conditions a), b) and c) are
always and only followed by gerunds.

3. A phrasal verb can still be followed by a gerund if it does not fulfill
any of these conditions
except a) although "Prevent (someone/sth) from is the only exception to
condition b) and is consequently
the only instance where a phrasal verb followed by a gerund has a
substantive object.
(In fact, it is the only instance where a verb followed by a gerund has a
substantive object.)

VERBS FOLLOWED BY "TO" AND THE INFINITIVE
A verb is always and only followed by the infinitive with "to" if,
a) It's meaning implies a single-minded purpose.
b) It begins with "would" and does not contain a stative verb as one of its
component parts.

COMMENTRY
I note that "fired up" is intransitive, so perhaps the concession to single-
minded purpose is unnecessary.
It could also be argued that winning is beyond the control of the speaker if
despite trying their best the other team is better.

Can anyone think of any phrasal verbs followed by "to" and the infinitive
which are:
1. intransitive,
2. do not imply a single-minded purpose,
3. are under the control of the speaker. (I'm not sure maybe this can only
apply to completed actions.)?

NB Rule 1 for gerunds does not imply that a verb CANNOT be followed by "to"
and the infinitive,
It mearly implies that it CAN be followed by a gerund ("go on" for instance
can be followed by either.
To prove this wrong you need to show catenatives.
that CANNOT be followed by a gerund.

My homepage is now:
http://www.geocities.com/endipatterson/index

and the diagram is at:
http://www.geocities.com/endipatterson/catenative.GIF

I'd be interested to know if you can view these pages. Some people say they
can't link through netscape, it may be that you can link through the
homepage but not streight to the diagram. Typing the URL usually works,
however.

Andrew Patterson.