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H. S. Teoh wrote:

>On Mon, Feb 02, 2004 at 07:50:41PM +0000, Joe wrote:
>
>
>>So, after a conlanging hiatus, I begin a new Conlang.  A small
>>comprehensive summary:
>>
>>
>[...]
>
>
>>Voice is inflected on the noun  There are four 'vocal' cases.
>>Transitive Actor, Transitive Patient, Intransitive Patient, and
>>Intransitive Actor.  There is a fifth case, which, unqualified, is a
>>verbal locative(describing where something is done).
>>
>>
>
>Voice inflected on a noun? Wow.
>
>
>

Yes, I think I was a little bored at the time.  But it's not as odd as
it sounds.

>[...]
>
>
>>However, sometimes the actor is the grammatical object.  For instance,
>>in the sentence "The small dog is being cooked by the man".  In this
>>case, more cases are neccesary.   These cases are different, according
>>to tense.
>>
>>na- Ergative
>>pa-  Absolutive
>>(In present)
>>i(?)-  Nominative
>>l=/l- Accusative
>>(In past)
>>
>>pedl\z paqOtan na?o?a
>>cook ABS-man-TRN.ACT ERG-small.dog-TRN.PAT
>>The small dog is being cooked by the man
>>
>>
>
>Just out of curiosity: how does the language handle indirect objects (or
>their equivalents thereof)?
>
>

5th case, plus preposition.  Incidentally, there are three locative
prepostions.  -  Actor-locative(The agent is in x) Patient-Locative(the
patient is in x) and Indirect Object Locative(The indirect object is in
x).   As well as verbal locative(where the  action occurs.)