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Quoting Joe <[log in to unmask]>:

> Philippe Caquant wrote:
>
> >
> >(*) The Germans renamed euro “teuro” (from “teuer” =
> >expensive), because the introduction of euro made
> >prices increase rather much.
> >
> >
> >
>
> I'm just wondering - how did this occur?
>
> I mean, from the few holidays I spent in France pre-2002, prices were
> marked in Euros and Francs. Surely, someone would notice if someone
> jacked up the price in feb. 2002.

The truth is that average prices went up very little (at least in Germany),
but, humans being humans, those that went up noticeably got much more
attention than those who stayed much the same or even fell, so the popular
impression was very much that average prices hiked. There was some excitation
in economical and sociological circles about the significance of this gap
between actual and perceived inflation, but I've not been hearing anything
more on it really for the last year or so.

I notice I have no word for "money", still less for any monetary unit, in any
of my conlangs.

                                               Andreas