Merhaba!
 
This is a conlang I started a bit after the trigger thread in December (I think), but I dunno where to go from here:
 
Mayara
 
Brief History
Mayara was first brought to the mountains in which its speakers live today by a tribe of Kosians about 2500 years ago. It underwent many sound changes under the influence of Proto-Kosi:
Proto-Kosi
*tülîzh
Proto-Mayara
*tüliz
Mayara
tuli
Proto-Kosi
*nyüköou
Proto-Mayara
*nyükowu
Mayara
nyuku
Proto-Kosi
*táva'i
Proto-Mayara
*tave
Mayara
tavi
Proto-Kosi
*ablaka'
Proto-Mayara
*ablak
Mayara
alaka
Proto-Kosi
*tavosknth
Proto-Mayara
*tavoskit
Mayara
tavo (tavos in some dialects)
Proto-Kosi
*basangomnte
Proto-Mayara
*basangombe
Mayara
basang
 
For about two hundred years, these sound changes continued. But over time, PK and PM drifted apart so that their grammar and lexicon became very different; nowadays, loanwords from PK in M are rare -- they were much more plentiful in the time of PM.
 
Phonology
 
All letters are pronounced as in X-Sampa; the exceptions are followed by their X-Sampa transcription.
 
Consonants
stops: p b t d k g
fricatives: v s sh /S/ z h
affricates: ts ch /tS/ dz j /dZ/
liquids: r l
nasals: m n ny /n_j/
glides: w y /j/
 
Vowels
front: i e /E/
mid: a
back: u
 
Phonological Constraints and Syllable Structure
Phonological constraints are numerous in Mayara; Mayara, as seen in its name, has many open syllables. The syllable structure is generally (C)V(N).
 
Stress
Stress falls on the first syllable of all words.
 
Morphology
 
There are no verbs in Mayara; English verbs are 'nominalized' in Mayara, but the Mayara nouns are not derived from verbs - they are words in and of themselves.
 
Nouns are divided into two main classes: animate and inanimate. Although the Mayarans adopted Christianity over 1400 years ago, the nouns then classed as 'animate' (e.g. 'sun', 'moon', 'fire' etc.) continued to be classed as such and are still as so today. Thus, all items in nature are classed as animate. Inanimate nouns include abstract nouns ('time', 'walking', 'redness') and man-made objects ('bread', 'chair', 'house'). Animate nouns end in -a or -e, and inanimate nouns end in -i or -u, e.g. zanasa 'sun', riniya 'moon', vekwa 'fire', sewimi 'time', wenku 'walking', ngozi 'redness', bwanya 'bread', chere 'chair', nyavu 'house'.
 
Mayara has a number of cases; these are marked with suffixes on the noun, as follows:
abessive: -ba
adessive: -da
agentive: -ko
allative: -te
benefactive: -dla
causative: -ka
comitative: -dza
conformative: -sa
dative: -go
delative: -do
distributive: -ma
elative: -le
equative: -li
essive: -sen
genitive: -je
illative: -ra
inessive: -tin
instrumental: -zo
introessive: -nya
juxtapositive: -to
lative: -mba
locative: -lo
multiplicative: -ha
mutative: -chi
partitive: -pa
perlative: -wi
prolative: -me
relative: -rei
stative: -nga
subessive: -bi
sublative: -jo
superessive: -nyo
translative: -tai
vocative: -yo
 
Number is only marked when it is not expressed by quantifiers, by doubling the noun: batera 'battery', batera-batera 'batteries'.
 
Imperative mood is marked with the particle sa:
sa al kitabu ru tone yakoba savi
the book must become gift from me to him
'Give him the book!'
 
The numerals are as follows: wada 'one', dawa 'two', tuhi 'three', apa 'four', lima 'five', ani 'six', kaja 'seven', pala 'eight', siyam 'nine', tinza 'ten'.
 
The sentence 'I gave him the book' is translated as follows:
al kitabu-n la tone ya-ko-ba sa-vi
the gift book-PNT I-AGT-ELL he-ALL