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On Thursday, March 25, 2004, at 12:36  PM, Andreas Johansson wrote:
> Quoting "Thomas R. Wier" <[log in to unmask]>:
>>> Would the fact I've seen the Akkadian name of Nimrud given variously
>>> as 'Kalah', 'Kalha' and 'Kalhu' (that's ignoring 'k'~'c' and
>>> 'h'~'kh'~'ch'
>>> variation) be related to that loss of case suffixes?
>>
>> Well, if so, those would be the forms without mimation or nunation.
>> (-am- being the marker for the acc. sg. case in Old Babylonian, and
>> long -uu being the nominal marker for the nom. pl.).  The form _Kalah_
>> might be the construct state form.  But it seems unlikely to me that a
>> Akkadologist would not normalize place names to their common English
>> forms.  I'll have to ask my friends over at the Oriental Institute to
>> be sure.   (I looked through my modest Akkadian lexica myself and
>> found
>> no entry for Nimrud like that.)
>
> My impression was that 'Calah' is the commonest name-form in English.
> However,
> google gives about 8k hits for that, 20k for 'Nimrud' and a bit under a
> thousand for 'Kalhu' ('Kalah' and 'Kalha' gives unrelated hits for the
> first
> page).
>    Andreas

Is this the same place as the |Hhlahh| mentioned in the Hebrew Bible,
Kings part2 17:6 as a destination for the exilees of the Northern
Kingdom?

"In the 9th year of |Hoshea`|, the king of |Ashur| (Assyria) conquered
|Shomeron| and exiled |Yisra'eil| (Israel) |Ashur|-wards; and he
settled them in |Hhlahh|, and in |Hhavor|, |Gozan| River, and the
cities of |Madai| (Media? Medea?)."


-Stephen (Steg)
  "and so Moses smote Pharoah upside the head
   with the staff of God, wherewith he hath done wonders."
  ('whoever expands upon the story of the Outgoing from Egypt is
praiseworthy')