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These Noun Classes reminded me somehow of Borges'
classification for animals:

(my own mediocre translation)

Animals can be classified as follows:
- belonging to the Emperor
- embalmed ones
- domesticated ones
- sucking pigs
- mermaids
- fabulous ones
- rambling dogs
- included in the present classification
- frantically agitated ones
- innumerable ones
- drawn with a very thin camel-hair brush
- having just broken the jug
- seeming like flies from far away
- others...

--- Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Quoting David Peterson <[log in to unmask]>:
>
> > Andreas wrote:
> >
> > <<I'm a bit daunted by a class _XIV_ nominal
> suffix. How many are there, and
> >  what differentiates them?>>
> >
> > Really?  You don't know about the 32 official
> nominal suffixes of the world's
> > languages specified under Universal Grammar?  I'd
> think it'd be in any
> > elementary text book...  At any rate, an example
> of a class XIV would be
> > /-ness/ in English.
>


=====
Philippe Caquant

"High thoughts must have high language." (Aristophanes, Frogs)

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