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Adam Walker wrote:

>I have a question about the English adj.
>old-fashioned.  In my usage it (about equally often)
>implies either "old, out-of-sytle and/or
>no-longer-useful" or
>"the-way-they-did-it-back-when-they-knew-how-to-do-it-right".
> In other words, it has either a negative OR a
>positive connotation.
>
>Her style is very old-fashioned. = She's out of step
>with the times and needs to up-date her look.
>
>All I want is some old-fashioned service. = No one
>today remembers how to give proper service, so I want
>it they way it used to be done.
>
>

In my usage, the positive connotation is almost always preceded by
'good'.  'All I want is some old fashioned service' would be a very odd
thing to say, while 'good old fashioned service' would not.