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> Frans Plank is the one David Petersen is referring
> to.
> He edited a book titled "Double Case: Agreement by
> Suffixaufnahme",
> published iun 1995 by Oxford University Press.  (I
> have never
> read that volume, just found numerous references to
> it when
> googling for "suffixaufnahme".)  Franz Bopp was an
> early 19th
> century linguist, one of the founding fathers of
> historical
> linguistics.  Coincidentally, he was one of the
> first to observe
> suffixaufnahme (in Old Georgian), but I think he
> wasn't the one
> who coined the term.
>
Yes, you're right. I found a page with a description
of the book. Bopp took suffixaufnahme to be more or
less a kind of agreement like in IE languages (which
it seems to be).

> >       > >
> > John saw Paul buy a car.
> >
> > John-nom. saw Paul-acc.-nom. buy a car
> > (I'm new to this, so forgive me if my gloss sucks)
> >
> > where "Paul" is marked to show he is the subject
> of
> > the second clause while he's the object of the
> first
> > clause. Sort of like switch-reference, but I'm
> > guessing it could go further--one noun may be
> marked
> > as an ind.obj. in one clause, dir.obj. in another
> and
> > subj. in another, with the noun said only once.
>
> From the abstract, I have the impression that
> Tariana has both,
> suffixaufnahme as I have demonstrated in Old Albic,
> *and*
> what you describe.
>
I would love to get a hold of a descriptive morphology
for Tariana. I can only imagine what sort of
monstrosities its nouns must be. I wonder if it allows
verb incorporation of a multi-cased noun.

> Greetings,
>
> Jörg.



	
		
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