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--- David Peterson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> The phenomenon you're referring to, I believe, is
> called Suffixaufnamen, and
> my morphology professor told
> me that a dude name Franz Planck (that name can be
> spelled four different
> ways; I chose one.   It might not be
> right) wrote a whole book on it.   Also, this is
> most common in Australian
> languages, so that's a place to start,
> but it can also   happen in Georgian.

Thanks! I'll keep looking. This is a fascinating
subject for me (being a native peaker of English,
perhaps the lowest context language in the world).
Some of these languages compress so much info into
what I am sure is a single lexical element for a
native speaker.
For example:
>
> d-is-a-s
> /sister-genitive-epenthetic vowel-dative/
> "to something belonging to one's sister"

So the utterance does NOT refer to "sister", even
though that's the root, but to "something" of the
sister. What would be really interesting to see would
be a language that allowed full verb incorporation of
such a word. I can't remember if Georgia allows noun
incorporation, but several other N. Caucasian
languages do.
>
> -David
>
*******************************************************************
> "sunly eleSkarez ygralleryf ydZZixelje je ox2mejze."
> "No eternal reward will forgive us now for wasting
> the dawn."
>
> -Jim Morrison
>
> http://dedalvs.free.fr/
>



	
		
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