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Carsten Becker scripsit:

> My prnounciation is mostly British English with some Americanisms I guess
> (e.g. [dE:ns] instead of the more seldom heard [da:ns])

This American was a bit mystified, as [dE:ns] sounds much more like
"dense" [dEns] or "dens" [dE:nz] (really only half-long) than like
"dance" [d&ns].  American [&] is properly the old formal long German a-umlaut
(though there is a non-phonemic distinction in length); English [&] is
closer to [E], though not close enough to be confused with it.

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