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Ray Brown wrote:

> On Monday, June 7, 2004, at 06:13 , Joe wrote:
>
>> Yeah, but I was emphasising conciseness.  I've found that a simple
>> sentence - verb, subject, and object, can't really be expressed with
>> less than three syllables.
>
>
> It certainly can, really & truly; e.g.
>
> tu l'aimes /tylEm/ two syllables
> je l'aime /ZlEm/   one syllable
>
> If you're after conciseness, then you must check out Skrintha's (aka
> Srikanth's) Lin. The first challenge will be to make your language as
> concise (and if you're stuck with the idea that a morpheme must
> consist of
> at least a syllable, you're onto a looser), then the real challenge is to
> improve on Lin's concision  :-)

Yes, but those are pronominal arguments.  I probably should have made
myself clearer.

A morpheme doesn't have to, but a word does.  Although, come to think of
it, it doesn't acutally have to be the nucleus...