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Philippe Caquant wrote:
>BTW, I may have bad eyes, but I couldn't find any
>differentiation between English and French 'p' (like
>in 'pound' # 'pondre') or 't' (like in 'to' # 'tout')
>for ex. To me, the English consonants are much
>stronger. Did I miss something ? Or does one have to
>use diacritic signs ?

This is an excellent example of how broad phonetic analysis is language
specific: In a broad phonetic transcription, [tu] might be a French word or
an English word, though in a narrower phonetic transcription, the English
word is more likely to be written as [t_hu:], with the 'diacritical' <_h>
indicating the aspiration, whereas the French might be transcribed as
[t_du], with the 'diacritical' <_d> indicating that the stop is dental, not
alveolar (I hope I'm not wrong).

g_0ry@_^s:
j. 'mach' wust