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Andreas Johansson wrote:
> Quoting Tristan Mc Leay <[log in to unmask]>:
>
>
>>Not only that, but last I checked, French doesn't have a /x/ phoneme. Of
>>course, I don't know anything about French and the phoneme that ought to
>>be spelt <ghqcwh> (/R/) may be devoiced in some contexts, but that
>>phoneme is still relatively new to French, and anyway, [X] is no closer
>>to [x] than [k] is (a German might---couldn't say for certain, totally
>>conjecture---think you're saying Barr or Back instead of Bach).
>
>
> This happens to be unlikely; [X] is a common realization of German /x/ - common
> enough that some books list the phoneme as /X/. In German, pronouncing "Bach"
> as [bak] is wrong, as [baX] perfectly normal.

Fair enough, I was going out on a limb here. But the rest of my points
still stand. French is not German. (Except in English, when all foreign
languages are essentially French.)

--
| Tristan.               |       To be nobody-but-yourself in a world
| [log in to unmask]  |  which is doing its best to, night and day,
|                        |                 to make you everybody else---
|                        |          means to fight the hardest battle
|                        |            which any human being can fight;
|                        |                    and never stop fighting.
|                        |      --- E. E. Cummings, "A Miscellany"
|                        |
|                        |     In the fight between you and the world,
|                        |                             back the world.
|                        |      --- Franz Kafka,
|                        |         "RS's 1974 Expectation of Days"