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On Jul 19, 2004, at 10:26 AM, Paul Roser wrote:
> On Fri, 16 Jul 2004 00:44:36 -0400, Steg Belsky <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>> It feels like a modified /S/ or /Z/ (depending on voicedness), with
>> the
>> tip of the tongue rising towards the alveolar ridge and the deep back
>> of the tongue retreating pharyngealwards slightly.
>> So what is it?  An apical /S/?  A /s/ with retracted tongue root?  An
>> apical /S/  with slight pharyngealization?  Maybe a laminal /s/ with
>> raising?
>> Help! :-P  (please?)
>
> I can sort of get a whistling sound if I make an apico-alveolar
> sibilant,
> but the whistling becomes more pronounced if I added labialization
> (lips
> shaped like I'm pronouncing /o/ or /u/). Adding
> pharyngealization/tongue
> root retraction does seem to increase the whistle somewhat. So a
> pharyngealized or RTR apico-alveolar, I'd guess.
> Bfowu


Thanks a lot!
So it'd be something like /s_a_q/ in C-XSAMPA, then.  Horribly
complicated but cool.


-Stephen (Steg)
  "You will begin to touch heaven, Jonathan, in the moment that
   you touch perfect speed.  And that isn't flying a thousand
   miles an hour, or a million, or flying at the speed of light.
   Because any number is a limit, and perfection doesn't have
   limits.  Perfect speed, my son, is being there."
      ~ _jonathan livingston seagull_ by richard bach