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Philip Newton wrote:

>>Thinking about it, the rule might be that stressed /E/ tends towards /I/ in
>>front of nasals. Examples:
>>end -> /Ind/
>>sender -> /sInd@r/ (merges with "cinder")
>>empire -> /ImpaIj@r/
>>emblem -> /Imbl@m/
>>Ent -> /Int/
>>emanate -> /Im@nejt/ (questionable)
>>These words aren't _always_ pronounced the way I've shown (often /E/ is
>>used), but the pronounciations I've given don't neccessarily sound wrong to
>>me.
>>
>>
>
>When I tried to pronounce those words as written, it sounded rather
>Australian to me.
>
>

It sounds Kiwi to this Australian, but I don't really know if I really
know exactly what [I] sounds like. (I gave a recording of my speech to
an American, and he said I said 'wind' (and other words with /I/ before
a nasal) as [wind] but other words with /I/ with [I], and I can't hear
the difference.)


--
Tristan.