Print

Print


Orthographical variations (e.g. spelling) turn out to be important if
you have a lot of texts of the same thing to compare. You can then apply
multivariate analysis to investigate grouping among witnesses. It is
nice to be able to have multiple views of each MS text; e.g., one that
levels orthography to reveal substantive textual variations, another
view that shows you each text as spelled by the scribe, and one that
shows the text as you would present it in a modern diplomatic edition
with sublinear dots etc.

Best

Tim Finney

On Thu, 2005-04-14 at 10:19 -0400, Dot Porter wrote:
> Hi everyone:
>
> I sent a message identical to this one to the Digital Medievalist listserv a
> couple of weeks ago, but I'd like to see what a more general audience
> (general in terms of time) thinks about encoding paleographical information.
>
> Feel free to reply to me off-list ([log in to unmask]).
>
> *****
>
> I have a few questions that I would like to ask those of you have, are, or
> are considering the electronic editing of [not necessarily medieval]
> manuscripts, and the recording of paleographical information about those
> manuscripts. I'm working on a project that has a focus on paleographical
> description, and I'm very interested in seeing what other projects are doing
> on this front. Is there a standard [so far, the consensus is no]? Is a
> standard approach to paleographical description possible, given differing
> concerns, uses, etc.?
>
> 1. First, a brief description of your project.
>
> 2. What paleographical information are you interested in? Letter forms,
> abbreviations, ligatures, other?
>
> 3. What is your purpose for recording these differences? Searching, display,
> counting?
>
> 4. How are you recording this paleographical information? Markup (TEI or
> other), entities, Unicode characters, other? Is your stored information
> different from that which you use for deployment/display?
>
> I'm especially interested in #4, markup vs. entities, vs. Unicode
> characters.
>
> Thanks!
> Dot
>
>
> **********************************
> Dorothy Carr Porter
> Program Coordinator, Research in Computing for Humanities
> 3-51/3-52 William T. Young Library
> University of Kentucky
> Lexington, KY  40391
> 859-257-9549                      http://www.rch.uky.edu
> **********************************