Print

Print


On Thursday, March 31, 2005, at 05:03 , caeruleancentaur wrote:

[snip]
> BTW, I never heard the word "deosil," although I am acquainted with
> widdershins.  "Widdershins" is of Germanic origin meaning "counter-
> course."

Yep.

> Can anyone enlighten me as to the etymology of "deosil"?

Scots _deasil_ pronounced variously as [di:zl=], [dEsl=], [deSl=] or
[di:Sl=] "sunwise movement" <-- Gaelic _deiseil_ "southward, toward(s) the
sun" <-- _deas_ "right[hand], south" +  Old Irish/Gaelic _sel_ (mod.
Gaelic _seal_) "turning" <-- *swel- (cf. Welsh _chwyl_).

The words for _south_ and _right-hand_ are the same in the Insular Celtic
langs.
==============================================

On Friday, April 1, 2005, at 02:11 , B. Garcia wrote:
[snip]

> I feel that this topic has been getting increasingly more complex than
> it needs to be.

I agree - I can't help thinking we have really exhausted the topic now   :
)

Ray
===============================================
http://home.freeuk.com/ray.brown
[log in to unmask]
===============================================
Anything is possible in the fabulous Celtic twilight,
which is not so much a twilight of the gods
as of the reason."      [JRRT, "English and Welsh" ]