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Sorry,
I have no idea how to explain this better.

Jeff

On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 00:06:06 +0200, Henrik Theiling <[log in to unmask]> 
wrote:
> 
> Hi!
>
> Jeffrey Jones <[log in to unmask]> writes:
> >...
> > Each of these classes is subdivided according to what genders each
> > argument is compatible with. The genders are "animate" and "inanimate";
> > there's also a 3rd "gender" for referring to situations rather than
> > entities.
> >
> > The arguments are labelled A1, A2, and A3, with actants arranged as
> > follows:
> > V3:  A1  A3  STEM  A2
> > V2:  A1  STEM  A2
> > V1:  STEM  A1, if 1st or 2nd person
> > V1:  A1  STEM, otherwise.
>
> This is very nice!
>
> > This is simplified, since I'm pretending there's no Inversion, which
> > would affect which role was associated with which argument.
>
> :-)
>
> > Now for the COMPOUNDING RULES.
> >
> > (A) The compound is constructed using one morpheme as a base, with
> >     its arguments become the base's arguments.
>
> What?  Base?  Could you give an examples?
>
> > (B) When adding a morpheme, one of its arguments is shared with one of
> >     the base's arguments.
> >     Assuming the morpheme is _prefixed_ to the base, the shared
> >     argument is the base's A1 and the morpheme's A2 (but A1 if the
> >     morpheme is V1).
> >     These arguments must be gender-compatible.
> >     If the morpheme is V1, the shared argument is the compound's A1,
> >     if not, but the base is V1, the shared argument is the compound's
> >     A2, and if neither, the shared argument is the compound's A3; this
> >     last kind is possible only if neither base nor morpheme is V3. The
> >     compound can become a new base.
>
> What? I cannot follow, sorry.
>
> > (C) The semantics of the compound depends on the specific combination
> >     of morpheme subclasses.
>
> Ok.
>
> > So far, I've only used verboid morpheme subclasses, producing only
> > verboid compounds. The same rules will work for nominoids, but there
> > are still a few things to be worked out, such as the gender of each
> > type of compound and whether the compound is nominoid or verboid.
>
> I think I need more explanation and an example.
>
> > Here are some TYPES OF COMPOUNDS that I've already worked out. These
> > are derived from 2 verboids in each case. I've omitted the gender
> > requirements.
> >
> >     1.  V3 from Locational V2 + Actional V2
> >         compound A2     = actional A2
> >         compound A3     = actional A1 and locational A2
> >         compound A1     = locational A1
> >
> >         Example:        He CARRIED the child TO the doctor.
> >
> >     2.  V2 from Locational V2 + Activity V1
> >         compound A2     = quality/state A2 and activity A1
> >         compound A1     = quality/state A1
> >
> >         Example:        She WALKED TO the store.
> >
> >     3.  V2 from Quality or State V1 + Actional V2
> >         compound A2     = actional A2
> >         compound A1     = actional A1 and quality/state A1
> >
> >         Examples:       He KICKED it TO PIECES.
> >                         They PAINTED the barn RED.
> >
> >     4.  V2 from Quality or State V1 + Perceptual V2
> >         compound A2     = perceptual A2
> >         compound A1     = perceptual A1 and quality/state A1
> >
> >         Example:        It LOOKS BIG TO me.
>
> I get the idea, but I don't see how it connects to what you explained.
>
> It looks interesting, I would like to understand! :-)
>
> **Henrik
> =========================================================================