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Thomas Alexander wrote:
[snip]
> In Esperanto, I use the same word for "bracket" as for
> "staple".  A few years ago, I was involved in a three-
> way discussion by e-mail about the preparation of song
> booklets.  Each person was using a different word for
> staple.  I recall checking the words in PIV and in
> various national languages and coming to the
> conclusion that there was no one clear "winner" in
> this case and that the best thing I could do was to
> learn to recognize all three.  It doesn't surprise me
> that you're finding something similar for "square
> bracket."
> 
> I wonder, however, whether the regula de tres is even
> applicable here.  Doesn't the rule apply to individual
> words and not to whole expressions?  The only single-
> word expression in your list is "crochet" (small hook,
> right?), which does exist in several languages, but
> not with this as a common meaning.  (Hey look, it's
> even in the IED with the meaning of using a hook to
> make blankets and doilies.)  I see no reason not to
> simply invent a descriptive expression based on words
> already in the IED such as parentheses, quadrate,
> recte, and angular.  Each of your expressions strike
> me as suficiently clear, and equally correct.  One
> could argue that "angular" has more prime vista power
> than "quadrate" or "recte", but when writing for
> people who actually *understand* Interlingua well
> enough to care, I suspect that this difference is
> tiny.
> 
[snip]

In some programming languages there are four types of parentheses/brackets:

	(...) parentheses/round brackets
	[...] brackets/square brackets
	{...} braces/curly brackets
	<...> angle brackets

In such cases, I'd call <...> "parentheses angular".