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In message <[log in to unmask]> Francois Lachance
<[log in to unmask]> writes:
> In reference to Jean-Luc's question about language and transliteration, 
> would it be tag abuse to consider the "lang" attribute?
> 
> That is, declare within the TEI Header something like 
> 
>  <language id="romgr">Greek in romanized transliteration </language>
>  <language id="gr">Greek in greek characters</language>
> 
> 
> and then at the appropriate spot in the file
> 
> 	<w lang="romgr"> ... </w>


The lang attribute is not available in P5. We have gone over to using xml:lang,
as documented in the CH chapter of P5.


>  
> 
> Alternatively, if several languages represented in the file have 
> transliterated forms... 
> 
> 	<w lang="gr" ana="translit"> ... </w>
> 	<w lang="jp" ana="translit"> ... </w>
>  
> where any instance a transliterated language segment can be referenced 
> via a link to a note on transliteration.
> 
> <note id="translit">Romanized transliteration </note>
> 
> This of course could accommodate references to several types of 
> transliteration schemes (e.g. Chinese in Wade-Giles or in Pinyin; 
> Tibetan in Roman or Chinese script).  
> 
> 
> BTW, the example in draft P5 doesn't yet address multiple transliteration 
> schemes at work in one document.
> 

Do you mean that there isn't an example of their use? The spec certainly permits
it, as you show in your examples below.

> See 
> http://www.tei-c.org/P5/Guidelines/ref-language.html
> 
>  <langUsage lang="en-US">
>   <language ident="en-US" usage="75">modern American English</language>
>   <language ident="i-az-Arab" usage="20">Azerbaijani in Arabic 
> script</language>
>   <language ident="x-lap" usage="05">Pig Latin</language>
>  </langUsage>
> 
> 
> However, P5 in Section 4.1 "Language Identification" gives some 
> examples of languages, scripts and and transliteration schemes ... 
> 
> zh-Latn-x-pinyin (Chinese transcribed in the Latin script using the Pinyin 
> system) 
> 
> 
> so this may be more appropriate:
> 
> 
>  <language id="gr-Latn">Greek in romanized transliteration </language>
>  <language id="gr">Greek in greek characters</language>
> 

... which was my original suggesiton to J-L.