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Yes indeed, I ought to have been less confusing on
that point, you are of course right.

-Elliott

--- Cian Ross <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Wed, 2005-10-19 at 08:54, Elliott Lash wrote:
> > Carsten Becker wrote:
> > 
> > > BTW, how were Irish and Scottish women called 
> > > if "O'" and "Mac" mean "son of"?
> > 
> >  First of all "o" means "grandson of" and is
> almost
> > exclusively for Irish names (from what I've seen).
> The
> > equivalent for women is "ni". (Both of which have
> long
> > vowels). Mac means "son of" and the equivalent for
> > females is "nic".   "Ni" is a short form of "Inion
> Ui"
> > "daughter of the grandson of", and "nic" is a
> short
> > form of "inion mhic" "daughter of the son of"
> 
> Pardon my pedanticism, but per the _Foclo'ir
> Gaeilge-Be'arla_ ((c)
> Rialtas na hE'ireann, 1977), "mac" (etc.) just means
> "son" (etc).  The
> "of" in the English translation comes from the
> genetive case of the
> following name.
> 
> 
> [log in to unmask]
> http://crlh.tzo.org/~cian/CR/conlang/
> 



	
		
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