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> > The *falling* diphthongs /ie y2 uo/ derive from historical
> >/e: 2: o:/.
> 
> Falling?  I pronounce 'Tuomas' something like [twOmas], i.e., the
> 'o' is more prominent, so this should be a rising diphthong.
> 
> > AFAIK *rising* difthongs do stem mostly from vowel + glide.
> > ...
> 
> Again, you mean the reverse, no?  From glide + vowel?  Otherwise I'd
> expect the first element to be more prominent.
> 
> **Henrik

No, I don't mean rising/falling intonation - but the vowel height.
Probably an easy source of confusion... Guess I should have used the
terms "opening" and "closing" instead.

Also, all of our difthongs - even the three opening ones, as
counterintuitive as that may seem - have falling intonation.

John Vertical