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      --- In [log in to unmask], caeruleancentaur <caeruleancentaur@Y...> wrote:
>
> [snip] 
> ...  How long have we been saying in 
> English, "It's raining cats & dogs"?  That to me is an idiom, 
> grammatically correct but semantically nonsensical.  ... 
> phrases are grammatically correct, but they are not nonsensical.  
> [snip] 
> ...  It is never 
> possible for it to rain cats and dogs, but the transferred meaning 
> is quite clear, at least for speakers of English.
> 
> Equivalent expressions in other languages are more logical.  
> Spanish: llueve a cántaros, it is raining by the buckets.
> French: il pleut des hallebardes, it is raining halberds.
> Italian: piove a catinelle, it is raining by the basins.
> German: es regnet Bindfaden/Strippen/in Strömen, it is raining 
> threads/strings/in streams; es gießt wie mit Mollen/Scheffeln, it 
> pours as if with beer-glasses (I love this one!)/bushels.
> 
> These all speak to the large quantity or the fierceness of the rain, 
> but are somehow logical.  "It is raining cats and dogs" is not 
> logical.  Yet I can't say that an idiomatic expression has to be 
> logical.  Maybe I want an idiom to have stood the test of time!
> 
> I'm just reflecting out loud.
> 
> I have not yet started to create such idiomatic expressions in 
> Senjecan, but I can start here.
> 
> rijáðrëßômi nimêrsa.
> rijáðr-ëß-ôm-i n-i-µêrs-a.
> waterfall-great-mutative-pl.  it-pres. time-rain-indicative
> great-waterfalls it-rains.
> 
> ß [dz)] = augmentative suffix.
> µ = m_0
> 
> Charlie
> http://wiki.frath.net/user:caeruleancentaur
>
--- In [log in to unmask], Carsten Becker <naranoieati@B...> wrote:
>
> On Mon, 14 Nov 2005, 07:45 CET, caeruleancentaur wrote:
> 
>  > German: es regnet Bindfaden/Strippen/in Strömen, it is
>  > raining > threads/strings/in streams; es gießt wie mit
>  > Mollen/Scheffeln, it > pours as if with beer-glasses
>  > (I love this one!)/bushels.
> 
> My environment says "Es regnet Bindfäden". Or just
> (classmates), "Es pisst" (It's pissing). Quite often, you
> can hear "Es regnet wie aus Eimern/Kübeln" as well.
> "Es regnet in Strömen" is common as well, although to me
> it sounds rather bookish.
> 
> Carsten
> 
> --
> "Miranayam cepauarà naranoaris."
> (Calvin nay Hobbes)
>
  --- In [log in to unmask], Henrik Theiling <theiling@A...> wrote:
>
> Hi!
> 
> Carsten Becker <naranoieati@B...> writes:
> > On Mon, 14 Nov 2005, 07:45 CET, caeruleancentaur wrote:
> >
> >  > German: es regnet Bindfaden/Strippen/in Strömen, it is
> >  > raining > threads/strings/in streams; es gießt wie mit
> >  > Mollen/Scheffeln, it > pours as if with beer-glasses
> >  > (I love this one!)/bushels.
> 
> Most of these I've never heard.  Carsten's examples are much more
> common and well-known to me, too:
> 
> > My environment says "Es regnet Bindfäden". Or just
> > (classmates), "Es pisst" (It's pissing). Quite often, you
> > can hear "Es regnet wie aus Eimern/Kübeln" as well.
> > "Es regnet in Strömen" is common as well, although to me
> > it sounds rather bookish.
> 
> Instead of 'regnen', you could also use 'gießen' (='to pour') in most
> cases (but not with 'Bindfäden').  Or simply just use it in isolation:
> 'Es gießt'.  Also, 'es schüttet' (~'pours').  And to not use 'pissen'
> explicitly, you can use 'schiffen' just like in most other contexts,
> too. :-)   (Originally, it means essentially nothing, stem obviously
> 'Schiff' ('ship'), but used due to sound similarity).
> 
> My dialect also has: 'Es plästert ['plE:st6t].'  But that's probably
> heavy dialect and completely incomprehensible to other Germans without
> context.  But it means nothing else, just 'heavy rain'.
> 
> **Henrik
>

  Thank you, Charlie.
   
  Hi, Carsten.  Hi, Henrik.
   
  Thank you all for your NatLang examples.
  Can any of you give us near-equivalent ConLang expressions, like Charlie did for Senjecan?  That's the kind of thing I was after.  I hoped it would be fun.  Since nothing I have is more than a sketchlang so far, I'd have to improve something to do so myself.
   
  Tom H.C. in MI
   




		
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