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On 11/19/05, Larry Sulky <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Elomi's genesis lies within Konya but it is quite a different language. It
> is even more vowel-y. Its morphology is even simpler. It is strongly
> head-initial. And I think it is prettier, more appealing, though at the
> cost, sometimes, of some extra syllables.

It looks like Elomi has exactly the same phoneme
inventory as Konya, and fairly similar phonotactics;
it's a pretty phonology and fairly good for an auxlang,
except I'm not sure /s/ and /S/ are distinct enough.
If you want three fricatives maybe you could use
/f/, /s/, and /h/, the last having allophones [h],  [x], [X]
and perhaps [C] -- but I prefer [C] as an allophone
of /s/ or /S/; I'm always puzzled when I think of how
German has [C] and [x] as allophones
(but Japanese having [p\] and [h] as allophones is
even odder, I guess).


On 11/21/05, Taka Tunu <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Just combine the foreign word X with another word explaining what it is: Person
> X, Country X, City X, Fruit X, etc. Things get pretty clear that way.

Toki Pona, which has a phonology pretty similar
to Elomi's, uses this system: all proper names
are adjectives that must follow some native noun.

If you do this, you might give foreign names the o-
prefix, and free up e- to mark intransitive
verbs while i- marks transitive ones [or vice versa].

I don't know when I'll have time to study Elomi at length
and comment on it in detail -- I know I promised to do
that for the new version of Konya back
in September and still haven't done it.  I like
them both but I think I need to give top priority to
studying Greek, and I recently started
studying Volapük again for reasons that are too
complicated to go into right now (look at the recent
AUXLANG archives if you really want to know).

--
Jim Henry
http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/conlang.htm
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