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Quoting Philip Newton <[log in to unmask]>:

> On 1/20/06, Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > On 1/19/06, tomhchappell <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > > --- In [log in to unmask], "Mark J. Reed" <markjreed@M...> wrote:
> > > > I'd say "vacuum" is a bogus example.  Despite the spelling, there
> > > > are only two syllables and only one vowel sound in the second
> > > > syllable; it's /'v&k.jum/, not /'v&k.ju.um/.
> > >
> > > Four major dictionaries on-line list all three pronunciations.
> > > Three of them list the ".ju.@m" pronunciation _first_.
> >
> > Whups.  My bad.  I had no idea anyone pronounced it that way.
>
> Nor had I.
>
> > > > English has a word "permille" analogous to "percent" for parts per
> > > > thousand; there's even a symbol for it, analogous to %: o/oo.  Rarer
> > > > still are "permyriad" and the corresponding symbol, meaning
> > > > parts per 10,000.
> > >
> > > Thanks; I've never heard or seen either of those words in English
> > > before.
> >
> > Neither had I until I ran across their symbols in the Unicode
> > Standard.  As I said, they're somewhat rare.  Perhaps even archaic at
> > this point.
>
> "permille" (as "Promille") is somewhat used in Germany to refer to
> blood alcohol concentrations, but its symbol isn't (I think - or not
> as much as the word). I hadn't seen "permyriad" before, though its
> meaning is fairly transparent.

In Swedish, _promille_, along with its symbol, is used in certain contexts, the
blood-alcohol being probably the commonest one, but certainly not the only one.

I hadn't heard of "permyriad" before, tho it's perfectly transparent. For ppm
and ppb we simply speak of _miljondelar_ "millionths" and _miljarddelar_
"billionths" (a _biljondel_ would be 10^-12).

                                               Andreas