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Andreas wrote:
<<
The closest real-world analogue for this I can think of is the  
variation by
more-or-less empty suffixes sometimes seen in biological  
nomenclature. Frex, in
1933-'34 Roewer named a bunch of solpugid genera as follows:

Solpugarda
Solpugassa
Solpugeira
etc.
 >>

Neat!  A lot of these endings look like either Finnish or Latin case/
adjectival endings.  Actually, a book on language in the sciences
(how it's used) would be utterly fascinating.  I think it's been  
mentioned
onlist before how Chemistry's been the birthplace of many a
suffix (e.g., -ide, -ate, -on?, -ode?).

What would be interesting is if other scientists familiar with each of
these genera went on to name other things using these suffixes in
a way that they felt was similar.  I.e., the differences between the
plants labeled as Solpug-arda and Solpug-assa would constitute the
differences between the suffixes -arda and -assa for naming other
plants--or, in other words, if it was done systematically, but that
systematicity arose spontaneously out of use, rather than the guy
inventing the suffixes and saying, "-arda means x; -assa means y",
etc.

Thanks for sharing, Andreas!

-David
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